Archive for 'Arizona Linux'

48x96-mint-xp-logosToday’s tip is once again using Disk Usage Analyzer that comes with Linux Mint and it is giving Windows XP another helping hand. You may recall a while back we Used Linux to check our Windows disk usage and found it to be quite useful.

I have XP installed on one hard drive in the computer, and I have Linux Mint 13 XFCE installed on a separate hard drive and I use Grub Super Boot Disk installed on CD when I need to boot into Mint.

Since the hard drive that has XP on it is a measly 80GB I loaded up the Disk Usage Analyzer in Mint to try to find any storage space hogs that I could eliminate.

restore-point-analyzer

As you can see in this screenshot, the System Volume Information folder used almost 10% of the entire hard drive! This simply cannot stand, I don’t care how official that folder name sounds. So, upon looking at it it was not too tough to realize those are restore points that Windows uses. I am quite well-versed in computers and I don’t think I’ve ever resorted to “rolling back” Windows to a usable state. Anyway I proceeded to investigate further and sure enough I found that Windows was set by default mind you to a max 12% hard drive cap almost 10 gigabytes!! as the image later below shows.

First, I clicked on the Start button, right-clicked on My Computer, chose Properties and got the System Properties box:

system-properties-box

Next, I clicked on the System Restore tab, and that’s what I saw that I had expected, extreme hard drive usage for something that 99.99% of the time I wouldn’t even consider having to use:

system-properties-system-restore-max

All right, that’s been confirmed. “Now how do I fix it?” you ask– Well, one way to fix it is to turn off System Restore, but honestly I’m a chicken and as much as I disparage Windows it might use that as reason to get back at me…I digress. So, I slid the slider bar down to 1%, a much more easy to swallow ~1GB of disk space.

system-properties-system-restore-min

Still a lot, but I can live much better with that. After you click OK, it will take a few seconds to adjust the space on the disk then you are done.

Where does that leave us? Now, we are going to go back to Linux Mint and check the Disk Usage Analyzer to see how much better it’s looking:

restore-point-analyzer-fixed

Much better now, we have gone from almost 20% of the entire used space on the hard drive and more than 7 gigabytes  to just 2.1% and just over 600 megabytes used.

This would not have been something I would have readily spotted without using my Linux tools to show me. This is also one more reason why someone that would ordinarily have no need for an OS besides Windows should have at least one Linux Live CD in his arsenal.

© 2012 Linux.Bihlman.com

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LAMP stands for: Linux Apache MySQL PHP. It is a popular way to get a professional style web hosting setup on one’s own computer. It’s quite simple to install and provides the major components of what is necessary to design and implement as simple or as complicated a website as one can imagine, just like having your own web hosting right on your own computer to experiment with!

The steps involved to getting a fully operational LAMP setup in Linux Mint 13 Maya are outlined below, complete with clickable screenshots.

Once again my system is as follows:

Intel Core 2 Duo 2.67GHz box with 2 GB of DDR2 RAM, Nvidia 8400GS card, running Linux Mint 13 Maya Xfce 64-bit.

STEP 1 – open a terminal and type sudo apt-get install lamp-server^
(note the carat “^” after server)

Press “Enter”

STEP 2 – Configuring mysql server – It’s always a good idea to change the default password whenever possible, make up a good one and don’t forget it!

…back to installing…

STEP 3 – Done with the terminal install for now

STEP 4 – Test the APACHE installation, open a browser window and type in the address: http://localhost/

Now test the PHP installation, for this we require a test PHP file in /var/www/ called test.php We can use a text editor as root, or as so often is the case we can type a command in the terminal: echo “<?php phpinfo(); ?>” | sudo tee /var/www/test.php

Once you do that, a restart of the Apache web server is required. That can be done by issuing this command: sudo service apache2 restart

After that is done, go back to the web browser and enter this address: http://localhost/test.php/ and you should see a page like this one describing your PHP installation:

STEP 5 – Fixing the Apache server qualified domain name error you may have seen in the terminal is easy enough at this point as well. Enter the following command in the terminal:

echo “ServerName localhost” | sudo tee /etc/apache2/conf.d/fqdn

Then restart the Apache server: sudo service apache2 reload

STEP 6 – Configure MySQL

It’s important to bind MySQL to your localhost IP address. Typically that IP address is 127.0.0.1, but we can verify that by issuing the following command:

cat /etc/hosts | grep localhost

In my case I saw this:

 

Next, verify you have the correct BIND address:

cat /etc/mysql/my.cnf | grep bind-address

In my case I have the proper 127.0.0.1:

STEP 7 – Installing PHPMyAdmin

The most convenient way to administer MySQL is by using this handy tool. As we’ve discovered so far, the process involved is quite easy. Back to the terminal we go, this time type: sudo apt-get install libapache2-mod-auth-mysql phpmyadmin

It will go through the familiar downloading process, then a screen will pop up asking which webserver to choose to be automatically configured to run PHPMyAdmin – Please choose Apache2 by pressing the space bar:

 

The next screen to pop up asks if you would like to use dbconfig-common to facilitate the use of PHPMyAdmin – as the screen shows, you should choose “Yes” unless you are an expert administrator.

 

Next, enter the MySQL password you entered earlier

Now, enter a password for PHPMyAdmin to register to the database server, then confirm on the next screen

STEP 8 – Testing PHPMyAdmin

Let’s make sure it’s working, type this address in your browser:

http://localhost/phpmyadmin

You should see this:

Now let’s login with root and the password we created earlier:

 Success! Congratulations, you have successfully installed Apache web server, MySQL, and PHP on your Linux Mint 13 machine. Hopefully the steps involved were straightforward and will reward you with years of fulfilling web development on your own computer.

 

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Glxgears reveals the advantages of installing proprietary Nvidia drivers to greatly improve 3D performance on your Linux system. This post shows step by step how to install the drivers on your system, as well as show the big increase in performance achieved.

My system is an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.67GHz box with 2 GB of DDR2 RAM, Nvidia 8400GS card, running Linux Mint 13 Maya Xfce 64-bit.

First, here is a screenshot of my glxgears running on my system before I install the Nvidia drivers:

Glxgears before Nvidia driver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, the after screenshot with the drivers installed, notice the huge improvement!:

Glxgears after Nvidia driver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How did I install the drivers? It’s easy, first click on Menu | Settings | Additional Drivers, highlight the appropriate driver (I chose the recommended one), then click “Activate” in the lower-right corner.

Before installing Nvidia drivers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s a big download, so depending on your Internet connection it may take a long time. (my high-speed connection got it done in about 10 minutes)

almost there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the install is finished you need to click “Close” and restart the computer to activate the driver.

Nvidia installed on Linux Mint!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for reading, remember Linux rocks!

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In this piece I will show how the system usage differs among Live CD distributions running different Linux Windows Managers mainly on distros considered to be lightweight. The first distro we will look at is a bit dated, but it is the most recent Fluxbox edition of Linux Mint, Linux Mint 9 Fluxbox edition, and is a damn fine distro that I must say looks great and it’s fun to use. The next lowest contender in regards to initial system usage is PCLinuxOS 2011.08 Openbox edition. Thirdly, we are looking at Crunchbang 10 (Statler) running Openbox. Finally, for comparison’s sake we also looked at the modern, full-featured Gnome distro, Linux Mint 12. We booted each distro using default boot options, then opened a terminal window and ran the ‘ top ‘ command.

mint-9-fluxbox-screenshotLinux Mint 9 Fluxbox edition

As you can see, this distro comes in at a svelte 536 MB of RAM usage upon intial boot

 

 

 

pclinuxos-openbox-screenshotPCLinuxOS 2011.08 Openbox edition

Next, we see a still slim offering from the PCLinuxOS team which comes in at 580 MB (this distro also curiously only saw 388MB of my 1GB swap space on my HD??)

 

 

Crunchbang-10-statlerCrunchbang 10 (Statler)

The last offering we are looking at today is the latest Crunchbang distro, based on Debian that comes in at a very surprising 815 MB of RAM – I’m really puzzled by that number and I’d love to know why it comes in so high on this test. (this distro also did not even see my 1GB swap space on my HD??)

mint-12-ScreenshotLinux Mint 12 Gnome

To show you what a current, standard distro uses we have included the latest Mint distro. As you can see it is running just past Crunchbang at 869 MB of RAM.

 

 

As you can see, the alternate Window Manager distros really do start with a lower system memory footprint, however that isn’t always the case we discovered by looking at Crunchbang.

©2012 Linux.Bihlman.com

This post proudly written using Firefox on Linux Mint 9 Fluxbox edition!

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In this tutorial we will show how easy it is to enable Adobe Flash player to your Linux Mint 12 Live CD. As usual, please click each screenshot for a larger view.

Linux Mint 12 Live CD -no flash

Linux Mint 12 Live CD -no flash

First step is to boot up your Live Disc and open Firefox. This screenshot shows what will happen by default if you try to view content that relies on Adobe Flash to display.

 

 

 

 

 

Type mint-flashplugin-11 into Software Manager

Type mint-flashplugin-11 into Software Manager

Well, obviously that is going to severely limit the functionality of your Live CD, so the next step is install Flash the easiest way I’ve found. Click on Menu and choose the Software Manager (the yellow star). In the search box, type mint-flashplugin-11  then click on it in the list.

 

 

 

 

Click Install

Click Install

Once you’ve clicked on the mint-flashplugin-11 that appears in the list, you’ll see the next window that will have the Install button. Click Install and the Flash player will install to the Live CD environment.

 

 

 

 

 

Now, once it’s installed, close the Software Manager and reload Firefox. Voila! Your Youtube page you were trying to watch earlier is now working!

Linux Mint running Firefox with Flash installed

Linux Mint running Firefox with Flash installed

That’s really all there is to it. If you follow these steps you will find installing Flash much easier than trying to click the “Missing Plugins” button that first appears.

©2012 Linux.Bihlman.com

post written using Firefox on the Linux Mint 12 Live CD!

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default linux mint 12 Menu

default linux mint 12 Menu

So, you downloaded Linux Mint 12 and are excited to try out all the fancy stuff that people have been saying about it. You have your Live CD burned, you boot into the desktop, you click on Menu in the bottom-left corner, see the popular folders listed there, but one seems to be missing– the games folder!

In just a few simple steps, we will show you how to get the Games folder to appear, complete with a nice selection of popular games for the Gnome desktop environment.

Step 1

Click on the terminal located under the Menu:

click on the terminal

click on the terminal

 Step 2

Type sudo apt-get install gnome-games at the prompt:

terminal window

terminal window

Press Enter when it asks if you want to continue, then it will download the games, and all the dependencies, all within your Live environment!

Step 3

Finished! Enjoy your new games, as you can now see, there are quite a few games to try out, for all ages. Here is a screenshot of the final product, that just took a couple of minutes of your time:

Finally, we have games!

Finally, we have games!

Here is a list of the games we just installed:

AisleRiot Solitaire, Chess, Five or More, Four-in-a-row, FreeCell Solitaire, lagno, Klotski, Mahjongg, Mines, Nibbles, Quadrapassel, Robots, Sudoku, Tali, Tetravex

©2012 Linux.Bihlman.com

post written using Firefox on the Linux Mint 12 Live CD!

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Windows XP doesn’t come with a utility that allows you to see what files/folders are taking up the most room on your hard drive.  Don’t fret: sure there are programs out there you can download and install to do the job, but did you know you don’t have to actually install any software on Windows to actually find out what’s hogging all of your disk space? Well, it’s really easy as long as you have a Linux Live CD lying around. In this tutorial, we will be using Linux Mint 12 since it’s very popular right now in the tech world it’s currently leading the pack according to Distrowatch. Baobab, more commonly known as Disk Usage Analyzer, is part of gnome-utils and it is just an awesome graphical disk usage analyzer. You’ll find it on just about all Linux distros running the GNOME desktop environment.

Linux Mint screenshotStep 1:

Fire up your Linux Live CD running a GNOME desktop environment, in this example you will see we are using Linux Mint 12. Then, navigate to: Applications | Accessories | Disk Usage Analyzer

 

Disk Usage Analyzer

 

 

Step 2:

Here you will see Disk Usage Analyzer, and since we are in a Live environment, it defaults to the Live CD environment as shown on the right. Click on the green “Scan a folder” icon.

 

Choose filesystemStep 3:

Choose your hard drive listed on the left side. It will be the item that mostly likely has a size listed in GigaBytes – In this case it’s my 39 GB Filesystem. Then click Open in the bottom-right corner. If you have multiple hard drives they will be listed here as well.

 

Windows filesystem displayedStep 4:

After the filesystem is scanned, it displays the top folders on the left in list form, also graphically on the right side, showing color-coded comparisons of each folder. You can also view it as a treemap chart if you choose.

 

 

Hopefully this tutorial will give you some ideas on how even if you don’t use Linux as your daily operating system, you can take take advantage of some of the unique capabilities you gain by at least having a little Linux at your disposal!

© 2011 Linux.Bihlman.com

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As the title suggests, a technically-inclined computer user probably gets more satisfaction running a PING test in Linux than Windows XP, as the screenshots below should indicate.

pinging google in linux mint 12

pinging google in linux mint 12

and now, Windows XP:

 

pinging google in windows xp

pinging google in windows xp

That’s the difference!

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Linux Mint 12 Live CD Review

I downloaded the latest version of Linux Mint 12 (Lisa) and I decided to try it out and write about some of the basics to get you started.

(Please click on each screenshot for full size)

TEST SYSTEM:

  • Via 1.5GHz microprocessor
  • Nvidia GeForce 8400GS video card
  • 1 GB of RAM
  • 1 GB of Linux Swap space on the HD
  • onboard NIC

The first boot attempt from the Live CD failed, so I had to add acpi=off to the Live CD boot parameters to get the OS to boot successfully. Once I booted into Mint 12, I was greeted with the desktop:

Linux Mint 12 desktop

Linux Mint 12 desktop

The first thing I decided to do is change the location since it always bothers me that Ubuntu-based distros always have the time many hours off, so, I clicked on the time at the top of the screen and selected my location:

adjusting the time/location in Mint 12

adjusting the time/location in Mint 12

Next, I decided to open a terminal, in this case Xterm from Applications | System Tools and execute one of my favorite tools, top to check the amount of RAM usage and a few other fun details:

The "top" command in Xterm

The "top" command in Xterm

 I would call those steps the first ones I always take when trying out a new distro. They work with just about any Linux distribution imaginable, but Linux Mint is special, and it’s quickly taking market share away from Ubuntu. “What’s next?”, you may ask…Well, I would take a look at all the cool apps available to you just a couple of clicks away in the Software Manager, located under Applications | Other:

Linux Mint 12 Software Manager

Linux Mint 12 Software Manager

Now that you’ve had a chance to peruse all the great games, graphics, productivity software available (and even installed a few with the Live CD!) you may be ready to install it as your primary operating system, or at least in addition to an existing OS. That is easiest enough to find, it’s got a handy icon on the desktop for your convenience!

p.s. This review was written using Firefox on the Linux Live CD!

©2011 Linux.Bihlman.com

Buy Linux Mint today!

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…and I’m trying to figure it out. I added some links to it, so I’m thinking I’m doing it right as far as that goes.

If you have any tips, I’d love to hear it in the comments!

thanks

http://delicious.com/free_linux

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