Tag: mkdir

gnuBy Rand Whitehall

In the Linux command line shell, moving around from directory to directory, adding new directories, and deleting old directories is easy once you know the proper commands. Again, with Linux, you are limited only by your brain! If you know all the commands, then you weild great power. But if you know only a few commands, it’s like you are standing in the airport in Tokyo and want to know where the bathroom is, but only know how to say hi and bye in Japanese.

Let’s get to it. Open a shell (or terminal) and type each line below followed by enter:

cd

pwd

You should be in your home directory, which is the same name as your username. So if your username is barney22, your home directory should be /home/barney22.

Now, let’s create a new directory to play with. (Remember, when learning the command line in Linux, always play with new directories and files you create to practice with. Never practice with important files and directories.) Type this:

mkdir doggy [enter]

ls [enter]

Now you should see your new directory called doggy in the ls output. Great! Now what? Let’s change the name. Type:

mv doggy doggyDo [enter]

ls [enter]

And you should see the directory name has been changed from doggy to doggyDo. Great! Hmmm… Now let’s go into the doggyDo directory and create a text file.

cd doggyDo [enter]

touch shibaken.txt [enter]

ls [enter]

Now, you should be in your doggyDo directory and see the new text file you created with the touch command. If for some reason you got lost somewhere along the line, go “home” by typing this:

cd [enter]

A cd command with no destination will take you home every time.

Now, let’s say you want to move the doggyDo directory into another directory. Let’s create another directory first, like this:

cd [enter]

mkdir doggyDocs [enter]

Now let’s move the doggyDo directory into the doggyDocs directory like this:

mv doggyDo doggyDocs [enter]

ls [enter]

You should see the doggyDocs directory now, but not the doggyDo directory because it is inside doggyDocs.

cd doggyDocs [enter]

ls [enter]

You should see your doggyDo directory there inside doggyDocs.

I hope you learned a lot about creating and moving directories around in the Linux command line. If this was a bit confusing, then just go through it again slowly. With a little practice your fingers will know what to do as soon as you think of it!

Rand writes about web design, Linux, men’s health and more. Please check out his DE safety razor site for shaving info and tips and the latest on the Merkur Futur safety razor. It’s a great resource for those who are passionate about a quality, close shave.

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Best Beginners Linux Commands

By Dennis Frank Parker

There are many common Linux commands that will be to your benefit, if you ever even use your command line software in Linux. Many average users just use the graphical user interface instead which usually provides many tools and front-ends to Linux common commands. This Linux system tutorial on control commands will help the average user in the event X server accidents, fails, is not properly designed, etc. So stay with me for some of the more prevalent Linux bash instructions.

Some of the more Best free Linux tutorials. A Linux system Unix shell commands tend to be listed below for more information on each command you can always manage man [command] and this will bring up the manage for that command, you can also click on the requires listed for some frequent examples and format.

First before I list them virtually any syntax in [] will be needing some kind of input of your stuff normally, for example:

guy [command] you will want to actually change [command] with the shell order you want to read the guy page for: gentleman ls will give you the man page for the Linux covering command ls.

    • linux ls command – is used to list files on the filesystem.

 

    • File – command that will check the filetype, this will output to you what the file type is no matter what the extension is.

 

    • Mkdir command – used to make directories on the filesystem.

 

    • cd- is used for changing into a different directory in the Linux shell

 

    • cp – is the Linux copy command, this shell command is used to copy files|directories from one location on the filesystem to another.

 

    • Mv – the Linux terminal command to move files|directories. Like the cp command, but deletes the original source.

 

    • rm- shell command in Linux to remove files|directories.

 

    • Linux cat command- this command is used to print|view the contents of a file to the screen|terminal.

 

    • Grep – command used to search|find contents of a file and print|view on your terminal|screen.

 

    • Linux more and less – commands that will allow you to read output of files, unlike cat that will output the entire file at once, even if it is too large for your terminal more and less will output only as many lines as the shell you are in can output, and allow you to scroll through the file contents.

 

    • Chown – Linux command to change ownership of a file|directory.

 

    • Linux chmod – command that allows you to change mode of user access|permissions, basically set read, write, and execute permissions.

 

    • Linux ps – lists the current running processes on your Linux system

 

  • Linux kill and killall commands – used to kill|terminate running processes

We Provide Best free Linux tutorials and Cbt nuggets training.

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