Tag: disk usage analyzer

48x96-mint-xp-logosToday’s tip is once again using Disk Usage Analyzer that comes with Linux Mint and it is giving Windows XP another helping hand. You may recall a while back we Used Linux to check our Windows disk usage and found it to be quite useful.

I have XP installed on one hard drive in the computer, and I have Linux Mint 13 XFCE installed on a separate hard drive and I use Grub Super Boot Disk installed on CD when I need to boot into Mint.

Since the hard drive that has XP on it is a measly 80GB I loaded up the Disk Usage Analyzer in Mint to try to find any storage space hogs that I could eliminate.

restore-point-analyzer

As you can see in this screenshot, the System Volume Information folder used almost 10% of the entire hard drive! This simply cannot stand, I don’t care how official that folder name sounds. So, upon looking at it it was not too tough to realize those are restore points that Windows uses. I am quite well-versed in computers and I don’t think I’ve ever resorted to “rolling back” Windows to a usable state. Anyway I proceeded to investigate further and sure enough I found that Windows was set by default mind you to a max 12% hard drive cap almost 10 gigabytes!! as the image later below shows.

First, I clicked on the Start button, right-clicked on My Computer, chose Properties and got the System Properties box:

system-properties-box

Next, I clicked on the System Restore tab, and that’s what I saw that I had expected, extreme hard drive usage for something that 99.99% of the time I wouldn’t even consider having to use:

system-properties-system-restore-max

All right, that’s been confirmed. “Now how do I fix it?” you ask– Well, one way to fix it is to turn off System Restore, but honestly I’m a chicken and as much as I disparage Windows it might use that as reason to get back at me…I digress. So, I slid the slider bar down to 1%, a much more easy to swallow ~1GB of disk space.

system-properties-system-restore-min

Still a lot, but I can live much better with that. After you click OK, it will take a few seconds to adjust the space on the disk then you are done.

Where does that leave us? Now, we are going to go back to Linux Mint and check the Disk Usage Analyzer to see how much better it’s looking:

restore-point-analyzer-fixed

Much better now, we have gone from almost 20% of the entire used space on the hard drive and more than 7 gigabytes  to just 2.1% and just over 600 megabytes used.

This would not have been something I would have readily spotted without using my Linux tools to show me. This is also one more reason why someone that would ordinarily have no need for an OS besides Windows should have at least one Linux Live CD in his arsenal.

© 2012 Linux.Bihlman.com

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Windows XP doesn’t come with a utility that allows you to see what files/folders are taking up the most room on your hard drive.  Don’t fret: sure there are programs out there you can download and install to do the job, but did you know you don’t have to actually install any software on Windows to actually find out what’s hogging all of your disk space? Well, it’s really easy as long as you have a Linux Live CD lying around. In this tutorial, we will be using Linux Mint 12 since it’s very popular right now in the tech world it’s currently leading the pack according to Distrowatch. Baobab, more commonly known as Disk Usage Analyzer, is part of gnome-utils and it is just an awesome graphical disk usage analyzer. You’ll find it on just about all Linux distros running the GNOME desktop environment.

Linux Mint screenshotStep 1:

Fire up your Linux Live CD running a GNOME desktop environment, in this example you will see we are using Linux Mint 12. Then, navigate to: Applications | Accessories | Disk Usage Analyzer

 

Disk Usage Analyzer

 

 

Step 2:

Here you will see Disk Usage Analyzer, and since we are in a Live environment, it defaults to the Live CD environment as shown on the right. Click on the green “Scan a folder” icon.

 

Choose filesystemStep 3:

Choose your hard drive listed on the left side. It will be the item that mostly likely has a size listed in GigaBytes – In this case it’s my 39 GB Filesystem. Then click Open in the bottom-right corner. If you have multiple hard drives they will be listed here as well.

 

Windows filesystem displayedStep 4:

After the filesystem is scanned, it displays the top folders on the left in list form, also graphically on the right side, showing color-coded comparisons of each folder. You can also view it as a treemap chart if you choose.

 

 

Hopefully this tutorial will give you some ideas on how even if you don’t use Linux as your daily operating system, you can take take advantage of some of the unique capabilities you gain by at least having a little Linux at your disposal!

© 2011 Linux.Bihlman.com

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