Tag: android

By Archie Spencer

androidI always hear the same question asked in several ways. “Can I actually learn how to produce apps for Android?” “How hard is it to study Android programming?” “Where should I go to learn Android programming?” “I just bought a new Android device, and I feel so inspired! I have an idea for a new application, but where do I begin?”

Mobile application development is really hot these days, and Android is now out in front of the rest in the mobile app world. And if you have already read this far in this article, I’m assured it is because you have already been asking some different version of one of the questions listed above. Today you are lucky, because I have already been down this road, and I have one resounding response: “Positively! It is really feasible to become able to write Android applications, no matter your background, and the tools to study and develop with are free and simple to use!”

So let’s begin with the tools. The number one tool for Android programming is the Eclipse IDE (Integrated Development Environment). Eclipse is free, runs on many operating systems (including Windows and Linux), and is often upgraded to provide better performance in development. In addition, the Android Development Team from Google has provided the Android Development Toolkit (ADT) plugin for Eclipse that turns it into an Android mobile application fabrication powerhouse! It turns application compilation into a one-click task, provides custom editors for layout files and resources, and automates updates for the latest revisions of the Android SDK. Some developers find Eclipse a little quirky, or even buggy to use at times (myself included). For example, it won’t always recognize new resource files until you restart it, which is sometimes a pain. However, I always use Eclipse with the ADT plugin for all of my Android programming, and I suggest that you do the same thing.

You may always opt to use a different piece of software, and there are many out there. But a word of caution about IDEs: many Android IDEs claim to turn mobile programming into a “drag-and-drop” process, or permit Android programming in other languages besides Java. Is it easy to create mobile apps using these tools? Of course. Will they be alright apps? Maybe. But will they be great apps – apps that really exceed expectations and extend easily with new features as the Android mobile platform evolves? No. Mobile programming is just like any other task worth doing: do it correctly (in this case, do it the Android way) and you will always have better success.

Now on to the study part. This part will take much longer than just downloading a simple tool. Learning Android development is like studying any other foreign language (and that is what this is – just a foreign language, except a language that allows you to talk to a computer instead of another human). It will require persistence, and a lot of trial-and-error. A good portion of readers will quit, telling yourself that it isn’t worth it. That’s ok: the remainder of us will succeed in the Android app market in your absence! For those readers who don’t quit, you will find the process very rewarding in so many ways.

If you don’t understand Java, that is how you need to start. When I started learning Android I got a little frustrated, because I didn’t already understand Java beforehand. After spending a week on the basics of Java, I learned that I could read the code samples and understand the examples. So start there.

Next is the Android SDK itself. There are so many studying tutorials for Android available that I really don’t have the room to list them all in this post. But Google does, so search for it. Search for “Android app tutorial” and start with the tutorial that suits you the best. It is truly that easy. I would also suggest the Android lessons found in the Android SDK online documentation for all of your coding reference needs about the Android platform. And don’t forget those newsgroups! They are one of my favorite places to find instant help from real developers who enjoy helping new programmers.

Archie Spencer is an Android development veteran, and has been building mobile apps for Android since 2010. He invites you to continue your journey on the path to dominating the Android app market by checking out his new Android App Tutorial, designed specifically with new developers in mind.

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Android Application Developer – A Whole New World of Possibilities

By Kim Dsoza

Google’s Android operating system has taken the world of mobile application development by storm, for quite some time now. Granted, there are still less number of apps available for the platform compared to the other platforms like iPhone, Blackberry and Symbian but this is for sure that Google’s Android has already started spreading its tendrils to other handsets. On its recent earnings call, T-Mobile announced that it has sold its one millionth G1 phone based on the Android open-source operating system, meaning it took Google just six months to do this. This by all means is an impressive feat considering the incredible anticipation and fervor for the iPhone.

Android apps cost a good amount each, and hence can be used to rake in a steady stream of income over time. Here are the advantages that I foresee for building an Android application vis a vis other platforms:

1. Android OS Roils SmartPhone Market: Android Mobile Operating system was introduced a year back and could hardly give a competition to Apple iPhone but with the recent slew of new Android based devices the growth has been phenomenal with a phenomenal 15 point jump in just 3 months.

2. Huge developer community support: The Android platform is open to all, and as such there is a dedicated community of developers actively working on this platform. If there are any troubles that the developers run into during the development phase, there will always be help at hand. Besides, if there are any bugs, community members will also offer help during testing phase. This will make sure that your apps are stable and bug free when those are released.

3. Ease of Development and Porting: By default, Android is configured to auto-scale everything in most cases, however if layouts are specified with exact pixel values rather than the other suggested options the developers can easily make the necessary changes with the help of published content. The support for porting legacy applications to add support for larger or smaller screens is rather much simpler in case of Android. Sometimes it might be as simple as adding the following into their AndroidManifest.xml

4. Stable platform: Owing to its Linux core, the Android operating system from Google exhibits rock solid stability and resists crashes. As such, the apps developed on this platform exhibit the same characteristic, resulting in rock solid stability, resistance to anomalies in the system.

5. Many sales options: The Android apps can be sold in a variety of ways. There is the Android App Market, which the majority of users access in order to purchase and download Android apps. Secondly, there are third party stores that just about anyone can use to sell their apps. Even you can set up your own store to sell the apps, which is a huge plus, considering many other popular platforms force you to sell apps from their stores only.

6. Excellent ROI: The Android apps cost quite a good amount to download; hence you can be assured of getting excellent returns over your investment. All you have to do is find a good Android application developer for getting your apps built, and upload it in a store that is offering good commissions over sales.

As Android’s growth continues to explode since the release of the Droid, one developer, in fact, wrote that his app, which was showing modest, double-digit daily sales late last year, now reports that his app is making $13,000 a month.

But in order to net a steady stream of income it is important to partner with a well reputed organization with an established record of delivering robust mobile applications and someone who can contribute not just from technology perspective but also add value by engaging in providing suggestions for future enhancements of the product.

For starters, check out Techendeavour.com. Endeavour Software Technologies is an expert in mobile technology and advises startups, SMBs and enterprises in defining the right mobile application, selecting appropriate technologies, wireless carriers’ relationship, and establish innovative roadmap for the continuous success as the future technologies changes over time. Can be reached at info@techendeavour.com

For more information relating to android application developer visit http://www.techendeavour.com

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